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Here’s a little game called Judge(s), Jury(s), and Executioners that the BBWAA (Baseball Writers Association of America) perform every year. The masses call it the MLB Hall of Fame Ballot. Many will never see it, many will face it, and very few will survive it, but the agony is in the purgatory of being on the ballot year in and year out knowing you are worthy of consideration but not quite making it in. I equate it to when the girl just wants to be your friend. Sometimes she dates a scumbag drug-addicted jerk who beats her, but would never dare ask you. At least when I think of a guy like Dale Murphy, who was on the ballot for his allotted forever and left to die alone just short, or a guy like Jack Morris who she even winked at, but just wasn’t what she was looking for.

Well, today I want to pretend to play god over someone else’s career as well, so here are my choices. Remember, by the rules of the HOF you have to have played for a certain amount of years to get on the ballot so if you didn’t play 10 years you don’t even get your name on the ballot. You have to be retired 5 years, and finally even as GOD I am only allowed to have 10 votes… so apparently I’m only a demigod and not as high of a moral authority as the HOF board of directors.  HYPERLINK “http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/12115949/jayson-stark-explains-2015-hall-fame-ballot” http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/12115949/jayson-stark-explains-2015-hall-fame-ballot Jayson Stark has a brilliant piece on this for ESPN.com.

I suppose I should give you the list of players eligible, and I almost forgot: you are now only allotted 10 years on the ballot. Think of it as a 40 days and 40 nights kind of thing. Here is your list to choose from… oh wait, you don’t choose… I do, but not really, they do! Who are they? They are not you (the fans)!  HYPERLINK “http://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/hof_2015.shtml” http://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/hof_2015.shtml

Randy Johnson. Why? The single most dominating pitcher of my lifetime, slightly ahead of #2 Pedro Martinez, Roger Clemens and maybe even Tom “Terrific” Seaver.

Pedro Martinez. Size isn’t everything, stuff is, and Pedro had the cocksure and creativity to beat you with a 94 mph fastball or a 78 MPH curve. He simply knew he was better than you were even if you were on this list or made this list in years past.

Craig Biggio. Catcher, centerfielder, and second baseman…All Star at all three positions, 3000 hits, and when you’re not a home run hitter a couple of other stats have to be looked at like oh this one:  HYPERLINK “http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/2B_career.shtml” http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/2B_career.shtml this kids is what we like to call gap power. And while he wasn’t the best defensive player at his position, 414 stolen bases and a career .363 OBP makes him a top of the lineup nightmare for, oh, about 20 years!

Barry Bonds. But But BUT!!! He did PEDs Brad!!!! Yeah, he also was the best player of the generation, and it’s me playing god here not you so judge not lest ye be judged

Roger Clemens. See Bonds but remove the bat and add a pitching rubber.

Mike Piazza. Did he or didn’t he? Maybe, but despite being a below average defensive catcher the man was a warrior and an offensive machine for his career. To me the question is do you go in as a Met or a Dodger?

Mike Mussina. Go back and click the link on the HOF ballot and then look at Moose’s numbers…realize he left on top after winning 20 games. While he never won a Cy Young award he was a perennial vote getter, and he pitched his entire career in the AL East.  Going new school on this one…look at his WAR.

Curt Schilling. Damn it! I hated Schilling as a player…truly one of my all-time least favorite players, but that blind hate did just that… it blinded me from how impressive he truly was. Bloody sock, or bloody moron aside he was big game Curt and no one was ever better over a career.

John Smoltz. He wasn’t quite ECK, but for a two way pitcher (starter and closer) no one else compares, and in big games? John didn’t get the notoriety that Greg Maddux or Tom Glavine got, but in the postseason they hid behind his back… he was the Braves best chance to advance every season, and a key reason they made the playoffs every year.

Fred McGriff. No steroids, no tabloids, and the only reason he didn’t hit the 500 home run club is because his back gave out on him at 493 (the same number that some guy named Lou Gehrig had). 100% class on and off the field. He was a dangerous hitter, a power hitter, and he was a devil to get out with his career OBP, and K rate. And as a god/demigod (pretend)… how can one not have appreciation for The Crime Dog?

Why didn’t I vote for the others? Because I’m subject to the laws of the HOF.

11. Don Mattingly 12. Allan Trammell 13. Gary Sheffield 14. Jeff Kent 15. Larry Walker 16. Nomar Garciaparra 17. Carlos Delgado 18. Tim “Sniff” Raines

Another year, another class enshrined in Cooperstown. Usually, my first instinct is to bemoan those excluded and bitch for the trillionth time about how crooked the voting process is. While I still think that process needs to be dramatically overhauled (I say replace the baseball writers with former players, managers, coaches, executives, etc.), I have to admit this year’s class is flawless. Not only did Craig Biggio get in before running into perennial snub status, but having John Smoltz, Randy Johnson, and Pedro Martinez in for a resplendent pitching class is a thing of beauty. I already made my case for Biggio in last year’s ballot, and I feel Johnson, Smoltz, and Martinez don’t need any further explaining or defending. Thus, my piece for 2015 will address only those who I feel were overlooked, and will hopefully get in next year.

 

Main Ballot

 

1. Alan Trammell: Man, I’ve been struggling with this one for years. I’ve always been a fan of Trammell, both on his own and alongside Lou Whitaker to form perhaps the greatest double play combo in baseball history. Not to mention, he was one of the legendary 1984 Detroit Tigers, easily among the five best teams to ever play the game. But for some reason, I always nudged Trammell into the “really good but not quite great enough” category when it came to being in the Hall of Fame. Nowadays, I’ll admit I was dead wrong about that. If anything, he’s simply an overlooked player that should be in by any measure. Baseball Reference’s WAR generator has him as the 93rd best player of all-time, and he boasts a .285 career average, 2,365 hits, four Gold Gloves, and the 1984 World Series MVP. Those put him in the same arena as inductees Barry Larkin and Ozzie Smith. Time to make him an inductee as well.

2. Mike Mussina: Last year, when I was making my picks for my full ballot, I was cold towards Mussina. He struck me as one of those perennially great pitchers who just wasn’t quite superlative enough for a plaque in Cooperstown. (Granted, this wasn’t helped at all by playing for many bridesmaid Orioles and Yankees teams.) Not to mention, if you scrutinize his career for the preferred sexy pitching accolades (career ERA, 20-win seasons, Cy Young Awards, etc.), he doesn’t look so pristine. However, my colleague Brad was insistent that he belonged, and as I took a closer look I changed my mind. First off, Mussina was a top-tier starter who spent his whole career in the American League, at a time when PED’s and the designated hitter coupled together to make the game more explosively offense-oriented. Also, his total numbers are far from shoddy: seven Gold Gloves (one of the best defensive pitchers of his era), 270 wins, and 2,813 strikeouts. Basically, he’s just above or next to Jack Morris, without the rings. I say Moose gets in, but I’ll admit it’s a debatable matter. If I had to pick between him and Trammell, I’d throw all my weight behind Tram.

3. Mike Piazza: I already laid out a good case last year, and while I’m glad to have a pitching-heavy class for 2015. that only kicks the inevitable down the road. 2016 should be Piazza’s year to get in, no excuses.

 

Golden Era Ballot

 

Alright, this is the nitty gritty of my ballot right here. Again, the main inductee class of Biggio, Johnson, Smoltz and Martinez was a triumph. It’s with the Golden Era ballot that the HOF really laid a goose egg this year. 16 members of the committee were presented with 10 candidates, each of whom contributed something seminal to game…and not a single one was inducted. So disgraceful was their snub that even Rolling Stone did a story on it, and rightfully so. Whether or not the BBWAA get it right in a given year, the Golden Era committee should always be relied upon to rectify any snubs and give legends their due. Their failure to do so this year was disheartening, and hopefully will be a distant memory when most (if not all) of the 10 snubs this year get in in the coming years. And hopefully, unlike in Ron Santo’s case, before they pass on.

1. Tony Oliva: I’ll be honest: For quite some time, I would doubt myself when making Oliva’s HOF case. I knew that he had worthy numbers before his career was cut short by gruelling injuries in the early 70’s, but I always figured I was letting my Twins bias drive my thinking. Before that cursed injury, though, Oliva packed in a lifetime’s worth: three batting titles, a career .304 average and eight All-Star selections. Not to mention, the scenario of having great numbers but being cut short by injury applies to HOF inductee Roy Campanella, whose place I don’t dispute one bit. Thus, Oliva is in. If there was one player that should have been a no-brainer for the committee this year, it was him.

2. Maury Wills: Even as a Dodgers lunatic, I hadn’t given Wills’ numbers a perusal in some time, at least in a “should he be inducted” mindset. Man oh man, should he ever: .281 career average, 2,134 hits, 586 stolen bases, and three World Series championships. Not to mention, he’s the man who singlehandedly revived base-stealing with his 104 swipes in 1962, the same year he won NL MVP. He probably had the most complete career of anyone eligible on the Golden Era ballot, making his exclusion all the more perplexing

3. Anyone!: I realize this could dilute my analysis above, but the truth is, any of the 10 candidates could have been justifiably selected. If not for their numbers alone, at least for their personalities as well. That doesn’t sound like a cogent case for induction, but the men up for consideration this year (Luis Tiant, Jim Kaat, Gil Hodges, and Minnie Minoso also among them) were some of the best characters the sport has ever known, in addition to being among the greatest players of their time. While I seek to grow in my understanding of statistics, even the most rigorous evaluation of the game should always have room for heart and personality. When the stats are all counted up and documented, it’s the fun swagger of a player at the top of their game that sticks with you most (think Tiant smoking his stogies in victory). Or, like Kaat, a good sense of humor that endears you to fans even long after you’ve hung up the spikes. Even with just one choice, the Golden Era committee could have recognized both talent and heart. Ultimately, they chose neither.

It’s getting harder and harder as a baseball fan in Minnesota to be excited about the game. The Twins needed to make some drastic moves, and they didn’t make any. They hired the safe, fan-friendly Paul Molitor to be their manager. They topped it off by bringing back or promoting almost every position of his coaching staff from within the organization, which does not give me a single shred of hope for the foreseeable future.   

The team needed to upgrade its pitching staff dramatically and to improve the outfield defense. They did upgrade the pitching staff, though not likely enough to make a real difference in this division. Ervin Santana’s non-traditional stats prove that he was better than his numbers showed last season, but he was on a much better team than the 2015 Twins are looking to be. They also brought in Tim Stauffer from the Padres to replace Anthony Swarzak, which is going to be a slight upgrade in talent, but it’s going to be difficult to imagine he’s going to sacrifice himself like Swarzy (ode to Gardy) did for this team. Tommy Millone should be healthy, and a strong competition between him and the two big dogs barking for the major leagues in Trevor May and Alex Meyer will be competing for the 5th spot in the rotation and maybe a bullpen spot. This is hardly breaking news.

The team also needed to upgrade its outfield defense, and it’s very likely that they didn’t do that because now questionable outfielder Oswaldo (all bat and no glove) Arcia has to learn a new position. Replacing him is Torii Hunter, who at age 39-40 showed to have the worst defensive metrics in all of baseball in Detroit last season. So while Arcia is likely an upgrade over Josh Willingham in LF, is Hunter an upgrade from Arcia, who is already below average?

This is all hardly breaking news… this, however, is all we have in Minnesota.

As for my ideal offseason overhaul: I would have put 4 years and $84 million into James Shields, put 1 year and looked at a 2 year, $20 million dollar deal with Nori Aoki (formerly of the KC Royals as well). Granted, this is more money than what the Twins have shelled out so far, but these players are proven and the contracts would have been productive contracts. I would also have put a contract together for starting pitchers Brandon Morrow and Kris Medlen. As for what I’d do away with, I’d be shopping Trevor Plouffe, Eduardo Escobar, and Ricky Nolasco. Plouffe would have been a much cheaper addition to the Yankees than Chase Headley was, and the Giants were in need of a 3rd baseman pretty badly as well following the departure of Pablo Sandoval. Escobar came out of nowhere and had a slightly better than average year and a much better season than anyone expected. He might have brought us a Stauffer-style pitcher and saved us the free agent.

Why would I go for so many veteran pitchers especially with injury concerns? Because every staff goes through injuries and needs depth and I would rather overpay for too many pitchers than continue to have the worst rotation in baseball.

Oh well, I’m just a writer and a fan. What do I know?

On that note… the Padres still have Cameron Maybin collecting mothballs in San Diego. He would likely be an upgrade at CF over Hicks (who can’t hit) and Scott Schaeffer, who caught lightning in a bottle last year here to become an average 4th outfielder.

My hope is that Molitor is more than just another Terry Ryan stooge, and someone who will accept the Twins Way of losing is winning as long as the owners keep making $100,000,000.00 a year in take home.

Hello everyone!

Sorry if things have been a bit quiet around here at BBP. Needless to say, the three of us have been busy with many duties in our daily lives, and mine has been just as crowded, if not more so, than when I was in college mere months ago. I recently finished writing a book about the California Governor’s Mansion for the Sacramento Historical Society, as well as a companion e-book for my Presidents Baseball cards (both of which will be available next year). Additionally, I was promoted to lead editor of Last Token Gaming, the video game commentary website my friend Terry Randolph and I started last year. I know I juggled all of these duties throughout the year and produced plenty of articles here, but these things required even more work and time as of late and thus I had to prioritize them. And I won’t lie, the soul-crushing (and sadly typical) demise of the Dodgers and A’s in the playoffs, followed by the infinitely more important loss of Oscar Taveras, necessitated something of a break from baseball for me.

That said, I want to ensure we’ll have plenty of excellent content coming in 2015. We’ll have our Hall of Fame ballots and season previews once again, and I’ll also be adding a new Twins column in addition to the Artful Dodgers. Next up for me will be a piece on new Twins manager Paul Molitor, his coaching staff, and who I’d rather see in their place.

Thanks as always for your readership and support. 2014 was a fantastic year of baseball and for the site, and I certainly hope BrushBackPitch can be even better next year!

 

Sincerely,

Marshall

Jim Morrison once wrote “death makes angels of us all.” Well, Sunday the St. Louis Cardinals lost their brightest star for the future in Oscar Tavares. His game clinching homer in the playoffs this year, and his steady-but-not-spectacular play as a rookie in 2014 was supposed to be the springboard to a superstar career.

Oscar was a consensus top-five prospect going into both the 2013 and 2014 seasons. He was tabbed to be able to hit for a high average with better than average power. Had he lived up to his hype we could have expected a .300/.480/.385 kind of hitter with 30 doubles and 25 homers most seasons for the next decade if not better.

Sadly he didn’t get to live up to the hype … he didn’t get to live.

I was Facebook friends with him. His English was improving and, while his interaction with his fans was minimal in a direct way, you could see that with assistance from his management he was trying to embrace the 21st century star athlete role through digital media, the social media and on the field, where it is reported that he planned to come into 2015 in much better shape so he could gain serious playing time with the perennial central division champs.

Sadly, his girlfriend was also in the accident with him, and has passed as well.

It’s a tragedy when a Roberto Clemente or Thurman Munson are killed during their careers, but at least they were allowed the chance to have careers. At 22 years old Tavares’ was just starting. His ceiling was the stars, and his potential will now be put to rest.

My heart goes out to his family, his friends, his teammates, and to the family and friends of his GF.

Hello all! First, an apology for the long layoff. With the summer of my lifetime giving way to fall, my already crowded writing schedule has only gotten bigger. In addition to wrapping up an e-book for my Presidents Baseball franchise, I’ve also taken on a second book for the Sacramento Historical Society, this one detailing the Governor’s Mansion. (If you can’t deduce what the first book is about, well, why are you bothering reading this site?) On top of that, Last Token Gaming, the video game commentary site I’ve been working on with friends for over a year now, has taken on a bigger staff and following. Even after graduation, I’ve been busy enough to still need a weekly planner to organize everything. And I wouldn’t have it any other way!

This isn’t to imply I’ve had a shortage of things to write about for BBP. We are, after all, in the midst of a surreal playoffs that featured an Orioles vs. Royals ALCS. That alone gives me carte blanche to unspool endless references to the last years either team won the World Series, 1983 and 1985 respectively. (The ultimate question in that vein for the ALCS: “Sister Christian” or “I Want to Know What Love Is”? Which year had the better power ballad?) Or, more dishearteningly, I could write a grueling eulogy for my Los Angeles Dodgers, who saw their season end in a manner so laden with deja vu that Yogi Berra would throw his hands up in a flippant, silent gesture. Seriously, what can I say beyond Clayton Kershaw getting rocked in the seventh inning twice in a series by left-handed batters named Matt, after he had dominated lefty hitters all season? And that, in true “only the goddamn Dodgers” fashion, this isn’t the first time a left-handed batter named Matt dressed in red has helped dash LA’s World Series dreams in consecutive years?

So, rather than masticate the remainder of the postseason or pathetically try to elicit sorrow for the demise of my $240 million team, I’m going to skip ahead just a hair and lay down my picks for this year’s award-winners. This won’t be an unbiased guess at who will actually win each one, but rather who I think should. Luckily, this year’s probable winners are so clear-cut and widely agreed upon for the most part, that who I think should win and who actually will should end up intersecting 100 percent.

Rookie of the Year:

Jose Abreu, AL: From the get-go of the 2014 season, this was likely going to be an easy pick no matter what. At first, you could have made a Floyd Mayweather-esque bet on Masahiro Tanaka receiving it for the Yankees, but his mostly flawless season was derailed for weeks by a partially torn UCL. Thus, the prime choice for AL Rookie of the Year is another international import: Jose Abreu of the Chicago White Sox. The Cuban first baseman quickly announced himself as one of the most surefire hitters in the entire game, walloping 36 home runs and 107 RBI. And that’s alongside a .317 average, proving Abreu is a genuinely resolute batter rather than just a one-note slugger. The White Sox as a whole don’t look like an emerging threat in the AL Central right now, but any South Side fan could forget their team’s shortcomings while watching Abreu’s mammoth shots leave craters in ballparks across the country. Continue reading

I know that I’ve been MIA for a while now, and I’d like to take a quick moment to explain why. As a lot of you know I am a lifelong Twins fan. Hearing Terry Ryan’s vote of confidence for Ron Gardenhire last month broke my heart. When you couple that with the Ray Rice situation, and the Chris Kluwe issue, which I wrote about in my last article, I needed a break.

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A tremendous event happened in Major League Baseball recently, although you might not have felt it. Hell, you could very well have not noticed or even forgotten about it. I’m of course referring to the selection of Rob Manfred as the next Commissioner of Baseball, a title that will become official in 2015.

My thoughts on this choice are … well, nonexistent. As tremendous as the announcement is, given his predecessor’s lengthy tenure, Manfred’s selection elicited no emotional response from me. No anger, no surprise, no excitement, just … nothing.

This isn’t to say Manfred is unqualified for the job. After all, his resume includes Harvard Law School, a long history of working in labor and employment affairs, outside counsel to MLB owners during the ‘94 strike and MLB chief operating officer. Yet If anything, that’s part of why his selection is as thrilling for me to write about as watching a documentary about blenders. I understand why it’s functional and necessary, but that doesn’t make it interesting.

I don’t expect MLB commissioners to be as eccentric and indelible as Rube Waddell or Lou Gehrig, but a little character or a momentous accomplishment doesn’t hurt. Stubbornly racist as he was, Kenesaw Mountain Landis instantly etched his place in baseball history not just for banning the Black Sox for life, but doing so with the steeliness he had as a federal judge. Peter Ueberroth sailed into the job after bringing the Olympics to Los Angeles in 1984, which made him Time Magazine Man of the Year and served as a pinnacle event in the patriotic epoch of the Reagan years. Continue reading

As the wise philosopher Ron Burgundy once put it: “Boy, that escalated quickly.”

In perhaps the most dizzying trade deadline ever, the American League erupted in an arms race in mere hours. First, my Oakland Athletics made a what-the-hell-but-it-makes-sense-when-you-cool-down trade with the Boston Red Sox, sending Yoenis Cespedes in exchange for Jon Lester and Jonny Gomes. Lester, of course, almost guaranteed comes as just a rental for the playoffs, but given his exceptional stats this year and playoff gumption in Beantown he’s worth it. Gomes, a key part of Oakland’s youthful last-minute run to a division crown in 2012, returns with a fresh World Series ring in tow and a chance to get another by strengthening the outfield.

Of course, the immediate reaction was panic over losing Cespedes, who will be a free agent after 2015. Yes, he dazzled A’s fans with a highlight-reel glove and a bat that won back-to-back Home Run Derbies. But peel yourself away from those highlights, and the truth is that while he’s a dynamic player, he was still hitting in the .250 range, and brilliant plays don’t equal top fielding percentage. Considering how stellar Josh Reddick has been upon returning, as well as Oakland’s eye-popping run differential, they have enough depth to make up for Cespy’s absence. (Almost forgotten in this shuffle is the fact that the Twins benefited in a trade for once, acquiring lefty starter Tommy Milone for Sam Fuld, who has already made his presence felt in the reshuffled Oakland outfield.)

Only hours after that, however, came the biggest announcement of all: The Detroit Tigers, already stacked with aces, landing David Price in a three-team deal. I’m not going to even try to be neutral here: I hate, hate, hate that this deal happened the way it did, and I’ll take some space to explain just why. First, the more rational part. To put it simply, Tampa Bay didn’t come close to getting the return they needed for parting with the best pitcher in their young franchise history. Remember, the Royals had to send a package to the Rays that included Wil Myers just to get James Shields, so the crop for Price should have been even bigger. By all accounts, when the Rays were languishing in last, this was what they were rightly demanding from interested teams. My Dodgers, for example, would have likely had to deal both Joc Pederson and Corey Seager, a highly valuable outfielder and infielder who are among the best prospects in the entire game.

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I’m a Minnesotan. Over the last week, the only sports headline that has come close to competing with the many Kevin Love trade rumors is the lawsuit filed by former Vikings punter Chris Kluwe against his former team.

Without going into every detail, Kluwe’s case deals with claims that his special teams coach, Mike Priefer, created a hostile work environment by saying things such as: “put all gay people on an island and nuke them until it glows.”

The Vikings coach denied it several times, but once it was corroborated by current Vikings player then Priefer admitted it. He was suspended by the Vikings for three games, which will be reduced to two if he completes sensitivity training.

Sticking with the NFL (this does lead to MLB, I promise), the league came out Thursday with its punishment for Baltimore Ravens star running back Ray Rice, busted during the off-season for dragging his unconscious girlfriend out of an elevator (this is on video).

The NFL slapped Rice on the wrist with a two-game suspension for domestic violence. This is half the punishment that Rice would have received had he used performance enhancing drugs. These penalties, respectively for Priefer and Rice, make a mockery of both domestic violence and gay bashing.

To read the rest of this post click here.

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